Roku No Jo

Aiki-Jo

Roku-no-jo (roku: six; no: of; jo: staff) is a 3-technique, 6-movement repeating exercise performed with a partner. It is drawn from several of the suburi and provides a simple introduction to distancing and blending with the staff, but through its variations also focuses on the abbreviation of 3 of the movements down to 1 movement, showing the student how to quickly flow from one particular technique to another. From this basic routine follow a whole range of cyclic patterns based upon the suburi that illustrate the flowing effect of one technique into another.

There are three basic forms, depending on the level at which techniques are broken down:

6-movements (Roku-no-jo)

1. Choku-tsuki from hidari-tsuki-no-kamae.
2. Lifting and blocking movement of Jodan-gaeshi-uchi from hidari-tsuki-kamae.
3. Cutting movement of gedan-gaeshi stepping forward with the right foot.
4. Drawing-back movement of gedan-gaeshi from migi-ken-no-kamae.
5. Striking movement of gedan-gaeshi.
6. Chudan-barai and return to hidari-tsuki-kamae with a large step backwards.

5-movements (Go-no-jo)

1. Choku-tsuki from hidari-tsuki-kamae.
2. Jodan-gaeshi-uchi from hidari-tsuki-kamae.
3. Drawing-back movement of gedan-gaeshi from migi-ken-no-kamae.
4. Striking movement of gedan-gaeshi.
5. Chudan-barai and return to hidari-tsuki-kamae with a large step backwards.

4-movements (Yon-no-jo)

1. Choku-tsuki from hidari-tsuki-kamae.
2. Jodan-gaeshi-uchi from hidari-tsuki-kamae.
3. Gedan-gaeshi from migi-ken-no-kamae.
4. Chudan-barai and return to hidari-tsuki-kamae with a large step backwards.

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About Takemusu Aikido South Africa

The Takemusu Aikido Association South Africa (TAASA), formally Iwama Ryu™ South Africa, is a free group of black-belted practitioners of Aikido based in Johannesburg, South Africa. Our aim is to promote and spread the traditional teaching method of Morihiro Saito Sensei, direct student of the Founder of Aikido, to all communities in South Africa.